Last edited by Mazutilar
Wednesday, July 8, 2020 | History

4 edition of Language, communication, and the brain found in the catalog.

Language, communication, and the brain

Language, communication, and the brain

  • 17 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Raven Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Language disorders -- Congresses.,
  • Neurolinguistics -- Congresses.,
  • Brain -- Localization of functions -- Congresses.,
  • Brain -- physiology -- congresses.,
  • Communication -- congresses.,
  • Language Development -- congresses.,
  • Language Disorders -- congresses.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementeditor, Fred Plum.
    SeriesResearch publications / Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease ;, v. 66, Research publications (Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease) ;, v. 66.
    ContributionsPlum, Fred, 1924-, Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease. Meeting
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC423 .L333 1988
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxii, 294 p. :
    Number of Pages294
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2391265M
    ISBN 10088167365X
    LC Control Number87020643

    language and communication, as well as the methods of analysis used by those who work in this field. It also considers the complexity of language by examin-ing various theories about how children acquire language. The fact that small children learn language in a relatively short period of time indicates that people may have innate language.   This book correlates English-speaking children’s brain development and acquisition of language with the linguistic input that comes from children’s books.

    OCLC Number: Notes: Translation of Mowa a mózg. Includes indexes. Description: x, pages: illustrations ; 27 cm. Contents: Language communication and the brain: the broader context --History of research on the relation between speech and the brain: major contemporary theories --Research methods for the stuidy of the speech-brain relation - .   Direct brain-to-brain communication has been a subject of intense interest for many years, driven by motives as diverse as futurist enthusiasm and military exigency.

    This part of the brain has come to be known as "Broca's Area." In , Karl Wernicke found that damage to a different part of the brain also caused language problems. This area of the brain ("Wernicke's Area"), was further back and lower in the brain compared to Broca's area. In fact, Wernicke's area is in the posterior part of the temporal lobe. Read the edition of Brain Facts as a PDF file. It's also available as ePUB and MOBI files, or listen to it as an audio book, available through Sound Cloud.. Download the high-resolution version of the book for printing (PDF, 66 MB).. Educators and those conducting neuroscience outreach to the public can request one free hard copy of the updated Brain Facts book here.


Share this book
You might also like
Catalogue of ballet and theatre material

Catalogue of ballet and theatre material

The fox in the attic.

The fox in the attic.

Trade reorganization

Trade reorganization

Europe looks at India

Europe looks at India

Chemistry and biochemistry of steroids

Chemistry and biochemistry of steroids

Magnetic and Electromagnetic Engineering

Magnetic and Electromagnetic Engineering

Lottie Eames

Lottie Eames

Oversight of Vocational Education, 1983

Oversight of Vocational Education, 1983

Jerry Bywaters, Lone Star printmaker

Jerry Bywaters, Lone Star printmaker

Calvinism, the doctrine of the Scriptures

Calvinism, the doctrine of the Scriptures

pansy speaker [microform]

pansy speaker [microform]

U.S. assistance to Egyptian agriculture

U.S. assistance to Egyptian agriculture

Language, communication, and the brain Download PDF EPUB FB2

The localizationism approach in this book and the brain book the case study method provides ample support for which areas of the brain are associated with the different types of language disorders, but provides almost no insight into the aspects of processing other than timing, or how the brain really permits us to have by: How do our brains enable us to speak creatively and build up an understanding of language.

This accessible book examines the linguistic and neuro-anatomical underpinnings of language and considers how language skills can systematically break down in individuals with different types of brain damage.

By studying children with language disorders, adults with right-hemisphere brain. The definitive book of body language Language Allan and Barbara Pease is a crisp and apt book for first readers of the topic.

It is a 'definitive' book meaning it clearly identifies body language cues and suggest possible interpretations for the same.

It is an easy to understand book as it has illustrations and examples to elaborate most by: Language, communication, and the brain. New York: Raven Press, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Fred Plum; Association for Research in Nervous and.

This book is a comprehensive look at sentence processing as it pertains to the brain, with contributions from individuals in a wide array of backgrounds, covering everything from language acquisition to lexical and syntactic processing, speech pathology, memory, neuropsychology, and brain.

Language Functions and Brain Organization explores the communication of how language is represented in the human brain. The discussions are organized around the following themes: whether language is a mental organ or a mental complex; the brain base for language; the requirements of a developmental theory of lateralization; and whether brain.

Language -with all of its magnificent complexity- is one of the greatest gifts we give our children. Yet, we so often treat our verbal communication with children in a casual way.

It is a misconception that children learn language passively. Language acquisition is a product of active, repetitive, and complex learning.

This journal is unique in that it provides a forum devoted to the interdisciplinary study of language and communication. The investigation of language and its communicational functions is treated as a concern shared in common by those working in applied linguistics, child development, cultural studies, discourse analysis, intellectual history.

Traumatic brain injury communication disorders are complex issues that involve both cognitive and physical processes. Fortunately, with the help of speech-language pathologists, most communication disorders can be effectively managed. Today’s article will discuss the various communication disorders a person can experience after brain injury.

Title: Language and the Brain Author: Loraine K Obler & Kris Gjerlow Created Date: 3/2/ AM. Each section or lobe of the brain is responsible for different functions, some of which are involved in communication.

For example, the frontal lobe is involved in language production (how you express yourself) and the temporal lobe in understanding what others are saying to you and how your thought processes work.

Language, as described above, is species-specific to human beings. Other members of the animal kingdom have the ability to communicate, through vocal noises or by other means, but the most important single feature characterizing human language (that is, every individual language), against every known mode of animal communication, is its infinite productivity and creativity.

L.M. Romanski, in Evolution of Nervous Systems (Second Edition), Introduction. Human communication is a distributed process that depends on a circuit of brain regions, especially frontal and temporal cortical regions.

Broca area, located in the ventral frontal lobe on the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is considered essential in the motor control of speech. Praise for The Visual Language of Comics from. Cognitive Scientists “In this pioneering book, Neil Cohn opens up a whole new domain of cognitive science: the study of how we derive meaning from sequential borrowing much of his approach from theoretical linguistics and psycholinguistics, Cohn is careful to let the character of the phenomena speak.

Our spoken language, however, recognizes how important body language is to our communication. Here are just a few of the phrases we use: Get it off your chest. Main article: Introduction to language & communication. Language, the transmitter of culture, and with it, much of our psychological make up.

Vygotsky called language a 'Tool of Intellectual Adaptation'. Our language allows us to have verbal thoughts, and with our thoughts we make the world. Language: History and evolution of speech and language.

CiteScore: ℹ CiteScore: CiteScore measures the average citations received per peer-reviewed document published in this title. CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a range of four years (e.g. ) to peer-reviewed documents (articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters) published in the same four calendar years, divided by.

Buy The Bilingual Brain: And What It Tells Us about the Science of Language Translation by Costa, Albert (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s:   Widespread damage to the brain’s language centers can result in global aphasia. People with global aphasia will have an extremely hard time expressing and understanding language.

In this article, we will show what our brains do when we listen to someone talking to us. Most particularly, we will show how the brains of infants and children are tuned to understand language, and how changes in the brain during development serve as preconditions for language learning.

Understanding language is a process that involves at least two important brain. Jeremy Teitelbaum is on the faculty of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo and is the author of Communication Strategies for Professionals used by thousands of college students, and the forthcoming book Speak from the brain: The science of connection and influence.

He has been teaching, training, researching, and consulting in communication for 20 years.The development of communication through language is an instinctive process.

Language is our most common means of interacting with one another, and children begin the process naturally. Neurobiologist Dr.

Lise Eliot writes: “the reason language is instinctive is because it is, to a large extent, hard-wired in the brain.I read Words can change your brain, in exchange for review from NetGalley.

The book was written by Andrew B. Newberg and Mark Robert Walman. The book discusses how communication can build trust, resolve conflict, and increase intimacy.

People need to chose their words carefully, listen, and observe non verbal body cues/5(57).